For those interested in learning about the art of wine-tasting needs to learn the first step.

Appearance

Appearance

Appearance

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Color, is it pale yellow or a rich red or purple? The hue will tell what classification it is. Clarity and viscosity can also be evaluated by sight. Wine like beer may be left unfiltered to preserve all of the distinct notes and flavors, in which the wine may be cloudy due to any sediment remaining in the bottle. Its worth noting that while some varieties of wine may have a slight haze, it shouldn’t be severely cloudy.

Viscosity

Appearance

Appearance

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Viscosity is seen by the stripes of wine that are left slowly rolling down the sides of a glass. Swirl your wine in its glass and observe the “legs “flowing down the glass. This allows oxygen in the glass and releases the aroma. This tells you two characteristics, sugar concentration and alcohol content. The higher the viscosity the higher sugar and alcohol content.

Nose

Mouthfeel

Mouthfeel

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Wines bouquet should be inhaled thru your nose to paint you a scene while this process can open up a whole new door of tastings which can elevate the subtleties of a wine. You now can characterize the wine as weak, moderate, aromatic or powerful. 

Mouthfeel

Mouthfeel

Mouthfeel

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Tasters consider the mouthfeel of a wine second to the assessment of the bouquet. The wine must NOT be swallowed at first. After taking a SIP, one will feel the sensations are closely associated with the wine either being sweet or dry. Tannins, naturally occurring polyphenol chemicals. The more tannins the dryer the mouthfeel. The body or weight of the wine is also assessed at this phase. This is a indicator of the wines body ranging from very light to heavy or full-bodied. Acidity, a tartness in the wine, also adds another dimension to the wines structure and can be assessed in its ability to hold together the flavors.